A lump in the anal area! Are these hemorrhoids (piles) or not?
Be careful about diseases that can be mistaken for hemorrhoids!

A lump in the anal area! Are these hemorrhoids (piles) or not? Be careful about diseases that can be mistaken for hemorrhoids!

Swelling

Swelling is often seen in "external hemorrhoids" with a lump around the anus or wart-like swelling, but it may also occur as a symptom of other diseases.

Rectal prolapse

What kind of disease?

The rectum prolapses out of the anus due to strain during a bowel movement or keeping the abdominal muscles tight. It is considered to be caused by weakening of the tissue supporting the rectum and loosening of the anal sphincter. It is often seen in elderly people and women with the experience of delivery. Surgery is required to improve prolapse.

Why is it easily mistaken?

“Rectal prolapse” is often confused with "prolapsed anus" in which the rectal mucosa prolapses from the anus with internal hemorrhoids. It is characterized by prolapse of the normal rectum instead of hemorrhoids. It cannot be cured with OTC drugs. Visit a hospital if it is suspected. Attention should be paid to the diet to avoid strain at the time of a bowel movement or constipation.

Why is it easily mistaken?

Crohn's disease

What kind of disease?

"Crohn's disease" is an inflammatory bowel disease that develops inflammation in the entire gastrointestinal tract from the mouth to the anus. In particular, it often occurs in the ileum, the lowest part of the small intestine, and large intestine, but inflammation may also occur in all parts of the gastrointestinal tract from the mouth to the anus and skin around the anus. It often develops in young people aged 15-25 years. Although the cause is not well understood, there is a theory indicating that the intestines react excessively to factors such as diet and infection due to dysfunction of the immune system.

Why is it easily mistaken?

Common symptoms of Crohn's disease include chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, loss of appetite, and weight loss, but symptoms such as swelling, pain, and itching occur in the anus, which are likely to be mistaken for hemorrhoids. Crohn's disease is often accompanied by hemorrhoids such as anal fistula and anal fissure.

Pyoderma

What kind of disease?

A chronic disease caused by inflammation of the apocrine gland (one of sweat glands) around the anus. A layer that accumulates pus is formed under the skin from the perianal region to the buttocks and thighs. Although not all of them are connected to the anal canal, many pus exits are formed on the skin. This is repeated and the skin becomes thick and darker. Thus, surgery to cut the thick skin and pus layer will be required.

Why is it easily mistaken?

The main symptoms of pyoderma are pus discharge and swelling. It is very likely to be mistaken for anal fistula that forms pus tunnels connecting the skin between the rectum and perianal region. Pyoderma is also often complicated by anal fistula. If it is left untreated, the range will gradually become large. So visit a hospital early.

Skin tag

What kind of disease?

"Skin tag" is the slackness of the skin left after swelling of the skin around the anus caused by hemorrhoids, etc., is cured.

Why is it easily mistaken?

The skin tag is the remains of the skin after the swelling shrinks and resembles external hemorrhoids. It is characterized by no pain and softness. Leaving skin tag untreated will cause no problem. If it gradually becomes large, visit a hospital.

Perianal folliculitis

What kind of disease?

It is regular folliculitis that develops on the skin around the anus. Folliculitis is a type of bacterial infection. Inflammation occurs to the hair follicles in the anus (where the hair roots are wrapped) and the pores become red. It occurs due to infection with bacteria when the anus is damaged or not clean.

Why is it easily mistaken?

Perianal folliculitis has very similar symptoms to anal fistula, which discharges pus and causes painful small lumps (swelling). It may cure spontaneously. If pain or swelling is severe, visit a hospital.

This article is supervised by:
Dr. Junichi Iwadare
Dr. Akio Kurokawa
Dr. Rikisaburo Sahara
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